Multiple Flaws Found in Mozilla Firefox and Firefox ESR

Multiple Flaws Found in Mozilla Firefox and Firefox ESR

A cybersecurity advisory was issued Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, regarding multiple vulnerabilities in Mozilla Firefox and Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR). These vulnerabilities could allow arbitrary code execution which could lead to a breach.

What It Is:
Mozilla Firefox is a web browser used to access the Internet. Mozilla Firefox ESR is a version of the web browser intended to be deployed in large organizations.

Successful exploitation of the most severe of these vulnerabilities could allow for arbitrary code execution. Depending on the privileges associated with the user, an attacker could then install programs; view, change, or delete data; or create new accounts with full user rights. Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than those who operate with administrative user rights.

See the original Mozilla Foundation Security Advisory for Firefox 65 and the Mozilla Foundation Security Advisory for Firefox ESR 60.5.

Threat Intelligence:
There are currently no reports of these vulnerabilities being exploited in the wild.

What It Means:
If your business or organization employs Mozilla Firefox or Firefox ESR, you will need to apply the appropriate updates after testing to prevent a possible security breach.

Systems Affected Include:

• Mozilla Firefox versions prior to 65
• Mozilla Firefox ESR versions prior to 60.5

Risk:
Government:
• Large and medium government entities: High
• Small government entities: Medium
Businesses:
• Large and medium business entities: High
• Small business entities: Medium
Home users: Low

Technical Summary:
Multiple vulnerabilities have been discovered in Mozilla Firefox and Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR), the most severe of which could allow for arbitrary code execution. Details of the vulnerabilities are as follows:

• A crash and out-of-bounds read can occur when the buffer of a texture client is freed while it is still in use during graphic operations. This results in a potentially exploitable crash and the possibility of reading from the memory of the freed buffers. (CVE-2018-18504)
• An earlier fix for an Inter-process Communication (IPC) vulnerability, CVE-2011-3079, added authentication to communication between IPC endpoints and server parents during IPC process creation. This authentication is insufficient for channels created after the IPC process is started, leading to the authentication not being correctly applied to later channels. This could allow for a sandbox escape through IPC channels due to lack of message validation in the listener process. (CVE-2018-18505)
• A use-after-free vulnerability can occur while parsing an HTML5 stream in concert with custom HTML elements. This results in the stream parser object being freed while still in use, leading to a potentially exploitable crash. (CVE-2018-18500)
• Memory safety bugs present in Firefox 64 and Firefox ESR 60.4. Some of these bugs showed evidence of memory corruption and we presume that with enough effort that some of these could be exploited to run arbitrary code. (CVE-2018-18501)
• Memory safety bugs present in Firefox 64. Some of these bugs showed evidence of memory corruption and we presume that with enough effort that some of these could be exploited to run arbitrary code. (CVE-2018-18502)
• When JavaScript is used to create and manipulate an audio buffer, a potentially exploitable crash may occur because of a compartment mismatch in some situations. (CVE-2018-18503)
• When proxy auto-detection is enabled, if a web server serves a Proxy Auto-Configuration (PAC) file or if a PAC file is loaded locally, this PAC file can specify that requests to the local host are to be sent through the proxy to another server. This behavior is disallowed by default when a proxy is manually configured, but when enabled could allow for attacks on services and tools that bind to the localhost for networked behavior if they are accessed through browsing. (CVE-2018-18506)

What To Do:
We recommend the following actions be taken:
• Apply appropriate updates provided by Mozilla to vulnerable systems, immediately after appropriate testing.
• Run all software as a non-privileged user (one without administrative privileges) to diminish the effects of a successful attack.
• Remind users not to visit untrusted websites or follow links provided by unknown or untrusted sources.
• Inform and educate users regarding the threats posed by hypertext links contained in emails or attachments especially from un-trusted sources.
• Apply the Principle of Least Privilege to all systems and services.

Negative Consequences of Lost or Stolen Data:
The loss or theft of proprietary data can have severe impacts, particularly if the compromise becomes public and sensitive information is exposed. Possible impacts include:

• Temporary or permanent loss of sensitive or proprietary information.
• Disruption to regular operations.
• Financial losses incurred to restore systems and files.
• Potential harm to an organization’s reputation.

Should your agency or business need assistance with the detection of vulnerabilities in any of the above products or updates to include patches, Dox can help. Please contact Dox if there is anything we can do to assist in securing your agency, business, or organization.

Thank you for your time and stay safe online.